Printing techniques

A little more information on the different printing techniques you can have:

Engraving
Engraving is when letters and designs are cut or etched into a copper plate. The plate is then inked. The paper is forced against the plate with tremendous pressure, drawing the ink from the depressed areas. This produces the characteristic indented or bruised impression on the back of the paper.

Choose this option if you'd like your invitation to be formal, traditional and you have a slightly higher budget.

Thermo Print
Thermo printing is when freshly printed inks are dusted with a powder compound. After the excess powder on the non-printing areas is removed by vacuum, the sheet passes under a heater, which fuses the ink and powdered compound. The printing swells or raises to simulate the look of engraving.

Choose this option if you'd like your invitation to be formal, with raised ink and you have a normal budget.

Lithography (Flat Print)
Flat printing is technically known as Offset/Lithography and involves printing directly onto the page in spot colours or full colour printing.  It is recognised by clean edges and smooth print.

Choose this option if you'd like your invitation to be more modern, with lots of colour and you have a more modest budget.

Blind Embossing
Blind Embossing is similar to the Engraving process, but without ink. The plate is pressed into the paper creating a raised look to the text or design. As blind embossing requires thicker lines to produce a clear impression in the paper.

Choose this option for monograms, motifs and front covers and you have a slightly higher budget.

Foiling
A brass plate is made up for this job and makes a great keepsake for the bridge and groom.  It is pressed down onto foil over card with great pressure leaving a bebossed design in foil. Foils come in many colours; metallic and matt.

Choose this option if you'd like your invitation to be modern, fun and you have a normal-high budget.